(206) 322-6500 info@mountzionseattle.org

Women’s Ministry

The Women’s Ministry consists of 19 circles that sponsor a church, community or mission project and participate in local and national conventions. A cabinet of elected officers meet monthly to coordinate programs for Mount Zion’s women. For information about this ministry, please contact Michelle Williams.

Phone: (206) 322-6500  |  E-Mail: women@mountzionseattle.org


Sick/Shut-In & Seniors

Abigail Circle

Abigail Circle is believed to be at least fifty years old, though there are no accurate records dating its inception.  The biblical character whose name this circle bears is described as an intuitive, wise and beautiful black woman who dealt capably with tough situations.  When Samuel died and was buried in Ramah, David, upon returning to the wilderness, sent greetings to Nabal, the rich husband of Abigail (1 Samuel 25:4-5).  David proceeded to ask for a customary gift for services rendered while the men were on Nabal’s property.  Nabal refused in a very insulting manner.  David took offense and immediately rounded up four hundred men to attack Nabal and his household.  A young man overheard Nabal’s remarks and warned Abigail of David’s intentions.  Abigail took loaves, skins, sheep, and other gifts and loaded them on donkeys to stall David’s assault on her household.

When Abigail approached David, she quickly fell on her face in submission, accepting the blame for her husband’s foolish remarks.  Her position and soft words showed great respect for this man of God.  She depended not only on her reasoning, but also on God’s grace.  Abigail began to remind David of who he was.  She also reminded him that vengeance belonged to the Lord, and that the Lord was the captain of the battlefield.  David repented, thanking Abigail for being an instrument of God and reminding him not to take matters into his own hands.

When Abigail’s husband, Nabal died, David sent for Abigail to be his wife because of his high regard for her.  She prevented David from shedding innocent blood and earned his respect. (1 Samuel 25:1-44, 2 Samuel 3:3)

Abigail illustrates a determination to make the best of a bad situation. The women of this circle are equally determined, using their talents and resources on behalf of the church they love and communities they serve.

Goals

The Abigail Circle is a group of women who are dedicated to living the legacy of Abigail in a number of ways.  These women are committed to showing love and encouragement to each other through monthly meetings and other activities.  They  show special compassion for  members who are ill and/or shut in.  Abigail members also work to be a blessing to others through various community outreach activities.

Eunice Circle

Meeting Time:  2nd Sunday 1:30 p. m.
Location:  Church or Members’ Homes

History

The earliest records Eunice Circle indicate that it was started in 1954-55 when Sarah Jefferson, the mother of the late Reverend Spencer Thomas, was the Circle Leader.

This Circle is named after Eunice, the daughter of Lois, the mother of Timothy.  Her name translates as “Conquering Well” or “Good Victory.”  Her husband was a Gentile, but Eunice was a Jewess, as was her mother.  Timothy was brought up by his mother and grandmother in the Jewish faith.

Eunice, Lois, and Timothy were converted to Christianity during Paul’s first missionary journey.  Paul was so impressed with Timothy that he decided to take him along on his second missionary journey.  Timothy’s mother and grandmother must have been honored for Paul to choose their beloved son and grandson to be his companion in prayer.

When Paul was imprisoned, he wrote what became known as the book of II Timothy.  It is from this writing that he speaks of Timothy’s mother, Eunice, daughter of Lois:

“I have been reminded of your sincere faith, which first lived in your grandmother, Lois, and in your mother, Eunice, and, I am persuaded now lives in you also.”

II Timothy 1:5

Goals

Like Eunice, the women of Eunice Circle possess a “sincere faith,” which is found in their strong Christian values and beliefs.  By caring for the spiritual needs of others, Mount Zion’s Eunice Circle members strive to live the example set for them by Lois and Eunice.  The religious influence Lois passed to her daughter, and that Eunice passed to her son Timothy, have been passed to the Circle named in honor of this remarkable woman.

Church and Community

Community outreach projects include clothing donations to battered women’s shelters, supporting church and community special events, and cleaning the pews and pulpit area of the sanctuary.  We strive to make a difference in the local community by undertaking two major church and community projects each year and several ongoing projects. Eunice Circle also participates in church organizations and ministries. In 2005, Eunice Circle had the highest annual attendance at Women’s Ministry meetings; several circle members hold local and regional offices. They highly value positive Christian training in the home, church, community, and beyond.

Mission and Services

Eunice Circle participates in giving baskets to needy families, sending cards and letters to all sick and shut-in Circle members, visiting the sick, and having prayer with those who request it. They have adopted senior citizens to whom they provide spiritual support with cards, gifts, and calls. They contribute to the United Negro College Fund, communicate with sister missionaries and participate in Women’s Ministries Missions projects. In 2005, Eunice Circle was instrumental in bringing the Lost Boys of the Sudan project to the attention of the Women’s Ministries and the church. As a result four of the Lost Boys were adopted and received pastoral assistance, religious training, tutoring, transportation services, clothing, household goods, and furniture.

Personal Development

A proponent of personal development, Eunice Circle was the sponsoring Circle for the Mable L. Harris Library located at Camp Burton.  They regularly have guest speakers on such topics as self-esteem, gifts of the spirit, inner and outer beauty, art and music appreciation, prayer and other subjects that contribute to enriching spiritual growth and unity within the church. They invite women from other congregations to share in worship services.

Hannah Circle

Meeting Time:  2nd Saturday at Noon
Location:  Members  Homes

Hannah Circle dates back to the years surrounding World War II.  Many of its members came to Seattle as defense workers, were wives of servicemen, or were half of a young married couple that was relocating in the area to work or establish a business.

As members of the Mount Zion Women’s Society, the Circle became known as Junior Matrons or Young Matrons.  This very strong group of young women eventually became Lois Circle.

Later, the Women’s Society reorganized and gave groups the opportunity to meet and work with other church members.  Many members were assigned to the Business and Professional #3 Circle where they maintained membership until the Circle was given its present name, Hannah, for the mother of Samuel.

Hannah Circle closely follows the American Baptist Women principles, stating the importance that church women unite in fellowship to help each one grow in personal devotion to Jesus Christ and in commitment to the mission of His church through worshiping, working, and witnessing in all areas of life–in the home, community, nation, and world.

Hannah Circle has historically donated to needy families for Thanksgiving and Christmas and has adopted a family at Christmas.  The Circle has also donated canned goods and clothing the Jubilee Women Center.  It assists Operation Night Watch throughout the year.  The Circle regularly visits the sick and shut-in and contributes to the Scholarship Ministry and Mable Harris Library.  Members assist the Health Ministry, Breakfast Ministry, and Feeding Program. Membership is open to anyone who seeks to serve.

Goals

 To serve the least, the last and the lost among God’s deserving children.

Lois Circle

Meeting Time: 3rd Saturday at 1:30 PM
Location: Members’ Homes
Circle President: Irma Lowe

History

Lois Circle was organized in 1961, comprised of thirty-five young African-American women who were originally called the Junior Matrons.  They were a very active group who sang, prayed and fellowshipped together..  Meetings were occasionally held in members’ homes, attended by speakers if there was a topic that was of interest to circle members..  Founding members cared for the sick and shut-in by sending cards and flowers.  Before long, their efforts were recognized on “Mission Sunday”, held each fifth Sunday, at Mount Zion.  Later these young women were dispersed and assigned to different church Circles.However, being apart didn’t stop them from giving.  Today, Lois Circle continues to fellowship with Christian sisters and to serve faithfully wherever they are needed.

Mabel Harris Circle

Meeting Time:  3rd Saturday at 11:a. m.
Location:  Members’ Homes

History 

Mabel Harris Circle was established in 1960 with approximately seventeen members.  Through the years the membership has been depleted through death and illness.  Yet Mable Harris Circle has remained together.

Mabel L. Harris Circle namesake, “Mother Mabel”, as she was called by those who knew and loved her during her lifetime, was born Mabel Leola Frazier on October 1, 1897, in Jasper, Texas.  Mabel received her early education in Nacogdoches, and attended beauty school in Dallas. She married Henry Harris of Dallas, Texas.  They became the proud parents of four children.  Mother Mabel was a member of St. John’s BaptistChurch, where Reverend McPherson officiated.  She was very active in the church and community.  She continued serving here in Seattle at Mount Zion.  She became a Sunday school teacher, church clerk, and President of the Women’s Mission Society from 1954-56 and again from 1959-65.  She was a life-long member of the Sunday School until her death.

The Leadership and members of Mabel L. Harris strive to keep Mother Mabel’s legacy alive by participating in community activities, visiting the sick, contributing to the Nate Miles Scholarship Fund, supporting missionaries, and Women’s Ministry functions.  They meet monthly to fellowship and praise God for His many, many blessings.  The Mable Harris Circle is actively recruiting new members. All interested women are welcome.

Goals

The goals of the Mabel L. Harris Circle are to tend the sick, support educational services for youth, support foreign missions, and contribute to selected community activities.

Queen Esther Circle

Meeting Time:  3rd Saturday:  1:00 p. m.
Location:  Members’ Homes

 History

The Women’s Society consisted of six circles and three auxiliaries in 1943.  Queen Esther Circle was part of the original group which also included the  Dorcas Circle and the World Fellowship Club.  The Mary Circle was organized in the early 1960’s as part of the restructuring and expansion of the Women’s circles.  Esther Circle, named for the Jewish girl who became a queen and saved her people, and Mary Circle, named for the Mary’s in the New Testament, merged in 1993 for such a time as this.  To prepare themselves for spiritual growth, members study the Bible and seek ways to apply the scriptural messages in their daily lives.

Goals

Emphasis is placed on building a faithful community of women who are willing and ready to serve in God’s world. These circles also focus special attention on providing services to senior citizens.

Homeless/Feeding Program

Deborah Circle

Meeting Time:  Noon 1st Saturday

History

In the late 40’s or early 50’s Mount Zion Women’s Society had A and B Circles, but in late1948 or early 1949, the women began to operate under the American Baptist model. Men were also members:  Mr. and Mrs. Charles, Deacon Bryant  Mary Adams was appointed to lead the circles in Yesler Terrace. Cornelia Moore, Juanita Charles, Ruth Brooks, her sister  Lanier, Ione Taylor and her husband, Zelda Brown, Janie Washington., and Joanna Law.  Rev. F. Benjamin Davis asked women to name their circles after women in the Bible.  A group met one evening and selected Deborah by unanimous decision.

Deborah was a prophetess, an inspired mouthpiece of God, a partner with Barah, a military general, a judge who spoke with confidence and assurance, a leader God used as an enabler, giver, responder, and a “Mother of Israel.”  Deborah treated the sons and daughters of Israelas her children by addressing their needs and seeking the best for those they loved.  She nurtured, encouraged, guided, and disciplined them as love prescribed.  Her influence was and will be felt for generations to come. She challenged all who love the Lord to “be like the sun as it rises in its might.”

With Deborah’s attributes in mind, Deborah Circle was formed in the early 1960’ss with the following members:  Rilla Allen, Fannie Bufferton, Mattie Casey, Alice Hall, Jane Hulling, Sarah Johnson, Mary Miller, Thelma O’Brien, and Melina Part.  The women decided to meet once a month in each other’s homes–which afforded them an opportunity to cook delicious meals and engage in Christian fellowship. Missionaries were invited to speak.  Since its inception, Bible Study has always been an important ingredient in Deborah Circle. Given responsibility for a portion of the fifth Sunday program, the large and very active Deborah Circle became known for performing skits.

Throughout the years members have faithfully tried to fulfill their duties as Christian Women with a purpose to serve.   The women adopted families during the holiday seasons.  They provided food, donated clothing to homeless persons who came to Yesler Terrace, and sponsored Sunday afternoon teas in their homes to support the Mount Zion Building Fund.   Programs have always included numerous holiday gatherings, exchanging gifts, picnics, and summertime fun.

Deborah welcomes women to join them as they continue their work for the Lord.

Rebecca Circle

Meeting Times:  2nd Wednesdays at 10:30 A. M.
Location:  Members’ Homes
Circle Leader: Juanita Riddick
Circle Colors   –   Fuchsia

Rebecca Circle was started in 1942.  Based on the life of Rebecca, as described in Genesis 24:16,  circle members wished to emulate many of the positive components of Rebecca’s life story.  Rebecca was courteous and helpful, industrious, hospitable, responsive, and trusting.  She was chosen as the intended bride for Isaac.  This was thought to be a blessing from God, as was the gift of twin sons, Esau and Jacob.

Rebecca Circle members respond to God’s call to exert their full potential for leadership in the life of the church and the world, understanding that each member has a different call and something different that can be contributed to the Body of Christ.

Rebecca Circle closely follows the American Baptist Purpose and the National Baptist Pledge.  Members are committed to doing the work of the Lord in the Church and Community.  Rebecca members participate in a feeding program started by Sister Mildred McHenry and  a Bible Study started by Sister Shirley Garner, the work of which was continued by Sister Gladys Stovall and lSister Nan Petitt.  Women of the Bible Programs began under the leadership of Sister Sadie Allen.

Currently the circle operates on a schedule of monthly assignments.  Each month a member brings a lesson based on a woman in the Bible.  Each member contributes to the Food Bank Feeding Program.  Members bring monthly donations of designated food items to help the less fortunate and/or homeless.  Rebecca Circle also contributes funds to  White Cross.  During past years members have engaged in a number of charitable crafts projects (smocks, fancy potholders, neck pillows, bed caddies, and tote bags) whose proceeds benefited  the less fortunate.

Rebecca Circle is also proud of other special projects: donation of 500 patchwork squares to a Baptist Convention in South Africa. ( Sadie Allen, Circle Coordinator of Church and Community); and in the category of Personal Development, circle donations were made to the United Negro College Fund, the Mabel Harris Library at Camp Burton, Washington, and the Annual Women’s Ministry Scholarship Fund.

Circle members have held office at the Parent Body Level..  Thelma Crowder served as Chair of Christian Social Relations and as Love Gift Chair.  Past President Lorraine B. Harris served several offices at the Parent Body Level including State Third Vice President, Parliamentarian, and four  years as President of the Mount Zion Women’s Ministry.

Rebecca Circle Leadership

 

Juanita Riddick                          Circle Leader

Mildred McHenry                        Secretary/Treasurer

Lorraine B. Harris                       Personal Development  Coordinator

Katherine Wallace                     Church and Community Coordinator

(vacant)                       Mission and Service Coordinator

Margaret Lavert                          Song Leader

Thelma Crowder                        Devotion Leader

Nan Petitt                                    Sharing and Caring

Externally focused. Internally strong.

Working Mothers/Lifelong Learning

 

Gloria Jewel Circle

Meeting Time: 2nd Saturday at 10:00 PM
Location: Parlor
Circle Leader: Alleas Baldwin

History

The Gloria Jewel Waggener Circle was formed in 1990 to fulfill a vision of Gloria Jewel’s that an evening circle be organized to accommodate the women of Mount Zion who worked or cared for their children and could not meet during the day.

Alleas Baldwin is credited with carrying on Gloria’s vision. It was suggested that the name for this new group be the Gloria Jewel Waggener Circle. In January 1990, the Mount Zion Women’s Ministry approved the new circle.

Why Gloria Jewel?

First and foremost, the charter members of the new circle were comprised largely of
her family and friends. Each of us has a deep and abiding love for her so it seemed right to honor her memory this way.

What are the attributes that are so strong and so positive in a human being that we would choose to be named after her? What makes that person so special and unique that their leadership, dynamic personality, basic goodness and unselfish giving of self are carried over to others long after their earthly body is gone?

Gloria Jewel embodied many of the attributes of the women of the Bible. Gloria Jewell had he loyalty of Ruth, the strength of Deborah, the commitment of Hannah, the beauty of Esther, the diligence of Lydia and the faith like the Woman who only desired to tough the hem of his garment!

Harriet Tubman Circle

Meeting Times:  2nd Sundays at 4:00 P. M.
Location:  Members’ Homes

“First taste of liberty, I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person now I was free.  There was such glory over everything.  The sun came like gold through the trees and over the fields and I felt like I was in heaven.

History

In the turbulent times of the 1960’s, the work of Christian women in the churches and communities was essential to the struggle for equality and respect.  In 1961, the Business and Professional Women’s Circle was formed. “Mother Mable” Leola Harris was the Circle’s first leader.  In honor of a great African-American woman’s contribution to the struggle for equality and true to its mission, the Circle was renamed the Harriet Tubman Circle in 1981.  Mother Mable Leola Harris, then President of the Women’s Society, recognized the need to accommodate working women. She handpicked Alice Thomas to be Harriet Tubman Circle’s first Leader.

A remarkable moment in the history of the development of Women’s Ministries occurred in 1989, when in her second term as Harriet Tubman Circle Leader, Gloria Jewel Waggener planned for a commemorative booklet of the Circle’s thirty years of missions. Waggener also planned the creation of a second professional women’s circle.  In furtherance of this, new members would be invited to the annual Christmas Party, set for December 10, 1989, in the Jesse Shield Fellowship Hall.  The fourteen new members in attendance were Gloria’s daughters, two granddaughters, and a niece, as well as a long lifetime friend and Nancy Buchanan’s sister.  Tragically, at the same meeting, Gloria Jewel Waggener collapsed, surrounded by her friends and family at the meeting, and passed onto Glory shortly thereafter.  The following year, Alleas Baldwin, Gloria’s sister-in-law, requested that the new Circle be incorporated into Mount Zion’s Women’s Society and named for Gloria Jewel Waggener.  The profound relationship between these Circles remains lovingly intertwined with Alleas Baldwin serving as a member of both Circles.

Goals

To serve the needs of working and professional women.

Statements of Purpose

The Harriet Tubman Circle has its own song, poem, and woman’s pledge.

Naomi Circle
Phyllis Wheatley Circle
Sojourner Truth Circle

Local & Global Missions

 

 

Priscilla Circle

Meeting Times:  2nd Sundays 1:30 P. M.
Location:  Church/Members’ Homes

 

History

The Priscilla Circle was previously known as Business and Professional Women’s Circle.  Members give Mrs. Accle Reuben, the third Circle Leader, credit for the growth of the modern Circle.

One of the highlights of Priscilla’s history occurred in 1965.  As a result of busy fundraising, Priscilla commissioned a painting for the Church Parlor by the well-known artist Reva Levine.  The painting, entitled Welcome the Bride used to hang on the south wall of the Parlor where the historical mural of church buildings is now painted.

Priscilla Circle has participated in numerous projects.  It was the suggestion of Mrs. Odessa Davis and Mrs. Zelda Brown to institute the Ebony magazine Drive.  As a direct result of the thousands of dollars raised, Priscilla Circle purchased equipment for the church kitchen. Members have also shared their time and talents with the children at the Seattle Youth Center.  Annually the Circle collects and distributes food baskets to the needy.  Members donate time collecting clothing for local and foreign missions, for MountZion and the community.

Circle members also participate in Women’s Ministry by holding offices.  Priscilla Circle has had members who were president, treasurer, Guild Counselor, literature chair, and on the Nominating Committee.  Some members have served as officers on the district level of both the American Baptist Convention and the National Baptist Convention.

The Priscilla Circle relies on both the American Baptist Convention and the National Baptist Convention for resources.  Guest speakers often attend the meetings.

Leaders truly keep us in the forefront of mission work, both by study and action.  Priscilla women stand strong and faithful in our commitment as Christian women.

Goals

Priscilla endeavors to involve all women of the church in mission work as they grow spiritually.  Circle Leaders still strongly remain dedicated to this purpose.

Leadership

Past Circle Leaders

 

Addie Booth                                                 Betty Coleman

Odessa Davis                                             Ora Gonzales

Accle Reuben                                              Virgie Gallerson

Alyce Hall                                                      Erma Frances

Marjorie Harris                                              Mozelle Brown

Lougenia Ray                                               Michelle Holmes

Thelma Pegues                                           Evelyn Haney

Rosa Williams

 

Chair

Thelma Pegues

Sojourner Truth Circle
World Fellowship Circle

Meeting Times:  3rd Mondays at Noon
Location:  Members’ Homes

History

World Fellowship is the oldest Circle in the church.  It was organized between 1935 and 1938 under the pastorate of Reverend Fountain W. Penick.  The Circle was organized by the First Baptist Church (under the American Baptist Association) for the purpose of getting women interested in mission work.

Meetings were alternated between First Baptist and Mt. Zion.  There was a Bible Study each week, an Easter Breakfast each year after morning service, and an Annual Tea.  The Women’s Mission came into being in the early forties.  Shortly thereafter, the Junior Matron’s Circle was organized.  Two of the present members of World Fellowship Circle—Edith Allen and Oneida Gallerson—were part of the Junior Matrons.

Goals

World Fellowship has a long history of dedicated ministry to its members, giving encouragement, advice, and inspiration, all of which God calls us to do.  All of this inspiration is to assist women in “going into all of the world” to do God’s work.

Youth Education

 

 

Mabel Circle

Meeting Time:  3rd Saturday at 11:a. m.
Location:  Members’ Homes

History 

Mabel Harris Circle was established in 1960 with approximately seventeen members.  Through the years the membership has been depleted through death and illness.  Yet Mable Harris Circle has remained together.

Mabel L. Harris Circle namesake, “Mother Mabel”, as she was called by those who knew and loved her during her lifetime, was born Mabel Leola Frazier on October 1, 1897, in Jasper, Texas.  Mabel received her early education in Nacogdoches, and attended beauty school in Dallas. She married Henry Harris of Dallas, Texas.  They became the proud parents of four children.  Mother Mabel was a member of St. John’s BaptistChurch, where Reverend McPherson officiated.  She was very active in the church and community.  She continued serving here in Seattle at Mount Zion.  She became a Sunday school teacher, church clerk, and President of the Women’s Mission Society from 1954-56 and again from 1959-65.  She was a life-long member of the Sunday School until her death.

The Leadership and members of Mabel L. Harris strive to keep Mother Mabel’s legacy alive by participating in community activities, visiting the sick, contributing to the Nate Miles Scholarship Fund, supporting missionaries, and Women’s Ministry functions.  They meet monthly to fellowship and praise God for His many, many blessings.  The Mable Harris Circle is actively recruiting new members. All interested women are welcome.

Goals

The goals of the Mabel L. Harris Circle are to tend the sick, support educational services for youth, support foreign missions, and contribute to selected community activities.

Mount Zion Baptist Church

1634 19th Ave

Seattle, WA  98122

(206) 322-6500

Mount Zion Baptist Church

1634 19th Ave

Seattle, WA  98122

Phone: (206) 322-6500

email: info@mountzionseattle.org

We are located between Madison St and  Pine St in Seattle’s Central District. Parking is available on the south side of the building. Wheelchair access is provided.